Projects

2014-present

From 2009 through 2013, Arizona had more than 5,500 suicides, 2,000 homicides and another almost 900 undetermined deaths. The impact of these thousands of violent deaths affects us all. Even if you have not been personally touched by such a tragedy, the social costs to the community, the burden on law enforcement and the criminal justice system, and the overall quality of life for Arizona residents are adversely impacted by homicides and suicides in our communities. And each one them is preventable.

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2006-present

The Arizona Arrestee Reporting Information Network (AARIN) is operated by researchers from Arizona State University at the west campus. AARIN is modeled after the National Institute of Justice's (NIJ) ADAM program. Based upon the proven research model employed by NIJ, the AARIN program provides a cost effective means for an early monitoring and warning system pertaining to drug usage of offenders in Arizona.

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2005-present

Wall with graffiti

Since 2004, the Center has been deeply invested in diagnosing gang problems in the Caribbean as well as understanding the capacity of Caribbean governments to respond to gangs. Funding for the Center’s work has been funded by several organizations in the projects described below.

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2011-present

Sponsored by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), ASU’s Center for Violence Prevention is currently collaborating with Sam Houston State University to evaluate the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network. NIBIN is a database managed by the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (BATF) that is composed of forensics ballistics image information. NIBN is the only database that permits nation-wide comparisons of ballistics evidence to determine if evidence from different crimes are associated with a single firearm.

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2011-present

National studies document that financial exploitation (e.g., fraud victimization) of elderly consumers has become an increasingly prominent problem, one likely to assume greater urgency as larger proportions of Americans enter the ranks of the elderly. Indeed, all 50 states have enacted elder abuse statutes, many of which focus on addressing financial exploitation of the elderly.

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2011-present

TaserA major focus on the Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety has been its focus on police use of force. This initiative has been lead by Michael D. White, Associate Director of the CVPCS, and an Associate Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at ASU.  Since 2005, Dr. White has been examining police use of the TASER.

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2010-present

The SMART policing Initiative (SPI), sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) seeks to focus police resources on places and people that are most responsible for crime and violence.  Under a national competitive solicitation, BJA has awarded SPI grants to approximately 30 law enforcement agencies throughout the United States.  Of these agencies receiving funding the CVPCS is working with the Glendale, Arizona P

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2010-present

The Center for Violence Prevention & Community Safety in partnership with Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc., St. Joseph’s Hospital, and Arizonans for Gun Safety, will provide analytic support during program implementation and conduct an evaluation of the Phoenix TRUCE Project. The Phoenix TRUCE Project is modeled after the Chicago CeaseFire program, and as such, adopts a public health approach in responding to violence in the community.

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2009-present

Going beyond a doorstep defense of U.S. security requires developing strategic responses to serious threats at some distance from U.S. borders. One such threat is that of third-country nationals who use Mexican territory as a gateway to enter the United States, often legally, to engage in criminal activity or to commit political violence.

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2009-present

Funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) the purpose of this study was to document the extent of case attrition in sexual assault cases and to identify the factors that increase the likelihood of case attrition.  We used quantitative data on the outcomes of sexual assaults reported to the LAPD and the LASD from 2005 to 2009, detailed quantitative and qualitative data from case files for a sample of cases reported to the two agencies in 2008, and qualitative data from interviews with detectives and with deputy district attorneys with the Los Angeles District Attorney’s Office w

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